Value of Antiques



-VALUE OF ANTIQUES
-ANTIQUE FURNITURE STORES
-ANTIQUE SHEET MUSIC
-ANTIQUE DINING CHAIRS
-ANTIQUE SEWING MACHINES
-ANTIQUE FIGURINES

-FLEA MARKET WHOLESALE
-FLEA MARKET MERCHANDISE
-FLEA MARKET GUIDE

-BRASS COLLECTIBLES
-MICKEY MOUSE COLLECTIBLES
-PRECIOUS MOMENTS COLLECTIBLES
-SUPERMAN
COLLECTIBLES
- COMIC BOOK PRICING GUIDE
- COMIC BOOK VALUE

The Value of Antiques: "Worth lies in the eye of the beholder"


So, how is the value of antiques determined? Well, it's really quite simple if you considered it in the following terms:

An item is only as valueable as the amount someone else is willing to give for it.

Hands down, the value of antiques are only as much as how much you can sell them for. The twist to this, however, is finding out the proper channels through which to move your item in order to achieve its maximum worth. Let's take a look at what you should do first.

First, try to obtain as many professional opinions as you can. This is critical in determining the value of antiques. Start by taking pictures of the collectibles in question and visiting a few antique stores in your area, making sure to inquire as to how much they would give you for an item such as yours. While an antique store owner might price your items low due to the nature of how they do business, the estimates you obtain from them will be important later for reason of comparison. Conduct yourself as though you are sincerely interested in selling, so as to intice the would-be buyer to put his best deal forward.

Next, get the opinion of an appraiser who assesses the value of antiques for a living. Don't contract them to broker out your items mind you, but have them estimate a conservative possible selling price, emphasizing that if their educated guess is an amount worth the effort, you will undoubtedly be in need of their services. Once you have collected this data, it is time to

make a comparison.

Remember those low-ball amounts you obtained from your local antique store owners? It's time to compare the appraiser's price to theirs. If the appraiser's price is at or below the average going price for your particular item, BEWARE! Store owners base their prices on what profit they can turn from their purchases, therefore if the appraiser's estimate is within that ballpark, then there is a pretty good chance that they are looking to turn a good profit themselves. The appraiser's price should be considerably higher, as an honest broker will want to sell your item for as much as they can, because their profits are based upon a percentage commission from the sale.

Once you have found an honest antique broker, the rest is between the two of you. Your appraiser may recommend that your particular item be put up for an open auction, or they might even feel better about taking offers from their regular clients through a private sale. Either way, the outcome will depend greatly on your particular items in question.

The value of antiques can range all across the board, but as long as you pay attention to the details and ask plenty of questions, you are sure to get the most for your money.